Like Nagoya Magazine

ByLike Nagoya Admin Posted Aug 3, 2021

Japan to tighten border controls on visitors from 3 U.S. states, Finland

The Japanese government said Monday it will tighten border controls for travelers from three U.S. states, Finland and some other areas in response to the spread of highly contagious variants of the novel coronavirus. (Kyodo)
Source https://newsonjapan.com/

ByLike Nagoya Admin Posted Aug 3, 2021

Cycle Routes Near Nagoya

With the Giro d’Italia and the Tour de France already done and Vuelta e Espana soon to come, you may be feeling inspired to get on your road bike and put some kilometers in your legs. However, living in the middle of the city, you may feel like there is nowhere to go; we are […] Source H&R Group K.K.

ByLike Nagoya Admin Posted Aug 2, 2021

Japanese life expectancy at all-time high

The average life expectancy in Japan reached record highs for both men and women last year. (NHK)
Source https://newsonjapan.com/

ByLike Nagoya Admin Posted Jul 30, 2021

You put WHAT in your curry? Japanese netizens reveal their favourite secret ingredients

“Don’t knock it till you try it” comes to mind for some of these!

Japanese curry is pretty simple to make. Just pick your favourite roux, add meat and vegetables and that’s it! But, much like other comfort foods from around the world, Japanese curry isn’t limited to just one recipe. Each person has their own individual way of making it, right down to the specific way they cut their veggies or how long to cook the curry for. And even if the same curry roux is used, the taste may vary from family to family, as people use their favourite secret ingredients to give their curry a unique taste.

We’ve seen some strange curry ingredients before, like matcha and sakura petals, but surely these are just trendy ingredients to attract foodies, right? Regular Japanese households don’t use such unorthodox ingredients… right?

A survey by Japanese lifestyle portal Kufura asked 437 Japanese women what secret ingredient they used in their curry, and the top ten results were posted.

10. Yoghurt
9. Tomato
8. Milk
7. Ketchup
6. Honey

5. Soy sauce

Perhaps not so surprising, soy sauce was the fifth most popular response. Proponents said they liked how it shifted the flavor balance from spicy to rich, and also how it added a traditional Japanese taste to the dish.

4. Garlic

Another pretty orthodox ingredient, garlic, comes in at number four. Because this is a ranking of “secret ingredients” though, respondents aren’t tossing in whole cloves and eating them like the large chunks of potato or carrot you find in Japanese curry. Instead, the trick is to grate the garlic before it goes into the pot, so that it melts into the roux.

3. Chocolate

Yes, a surprising number of respondents (36) said they added chocolate to their curry. Dark chocolate was favoured over milk, in order to give the flavor extra depth without making it sugary sweet.

2. Worcestershire sauce

Ketchup made an appearance in the top ten, but the second most popular secret ingredient was what’s simply called “sosu” in Japanese, a savory liquid seasoning most similar to Worcestershire sauce. Because the sauce itself is made up of a mixture of various spices, it can added to curry to enhance the flavor without overpowering the roux’s inherent taste.

And finally…

1. Instant coffee

Taking the top spot in the secret ingredients was instant coffee, for those who want a sweet caffeine hit with their meal. With Japanese curry already representing spicy, salty, and sweet notes pretty strongly, the addition of a bitter element really makes for a complete, maturely sophisticated eating experience for fans.

The top ten most popular responses have a couple of unusual ingredients in there, but other less common but equally unusual answers included Calpis (“It gives the curry a refreshing taste,”) and leftover jam (“It’s eco-friendly,”). Equally, a number of respondents replied that they didn’t use any secret ingredient at all, preferring to enjoy the taste of the roux on its own.

Next time you make yourself some Japanese curry, why not try one of these ingredients for yourself? You might end up discovering your new favourite flavour! Just… whatever you do, don’t call it katsu curry unless there’s some actual breaded cutlets on the top!

Source: Kufura via Yahoo! Japan News via Jin
Featured image: Pakutaso
Insert images: Pakutaso (1, 2) Pakutaso
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ByLike Nagoya Admin Posted Jul 29, 2021

Japan’s hikers return to Mount Fuji

“It is a mountain that is an object of worship.” Hikers are flocking back to Japan’s iconic Mount Fuji as the active volcano’s symmetrical slopes reopen to the public after being off-limits for a year due to the COVID-19 pandemic. (Al Jazeera)
Source https://newsonjapan.com/

ByLike Nagoya Admin Posted Jul 28, 2021

Lawson now giving customers who bring their own tumblers an even better discount on coffee drinks

It’s nicer than Starbucks’ 20-yen discount!

If you’re someone who always has to stop and get coffee on the way to work, take note! Lawson’s budget-friendly convenience store coffee shop “Machi Cafe”–whose staff insist on handing you your coffee even if you don’t want them to–is now even more wallet-friendly, because they’re offering customers who bring their own travel mug or tumbler an even better discount than usual!

Since the introduction of Machi Cafe in Lawsons around the country in 2011, the company has always offered a decent 10-yen (US$0.09) discount to customers who bring their own container in an effort to help reduce their single-use plastic waste. Since 2017, however, they’ve made it their goal to reduce their plastic consumption by 30 percent by 2030, so they have been working to do more to reach that goal.

For instance, in 2019, they switched to selling their iced coffee in a paper cup and replaced the lid with one that doesn’t need a straw. This summer, they’re thanking their customers for helping with that goal by offering a 39-yen discount for coffee fans who bring their own travel mug!

That beats out Starbucks Japan’s 20-yen discount (which is normally better than Lawson’s usual discount, though Lawson’s coffee is generally cheaper anyway), so if you’re addicted to coffee but on a budget, Lawson is the place to go. The discount applies to both hot and cold coffee and latte drinks (excluding the mega size, which does not count for the normal tumbler discount, either).

They’re calling it the “Thank you” discount (because 3=”san” and 9=”kyuu”, adding up to “sankyuu”), but it won’t be around for long; this nice benefit will only last till August 30, so get your coffee fill while you can! You can even bring your favorite Starbucks travel mug; don’t worry, no one will judge you.

Source: Oricon News via Livedoor News via Otacom, Lawson
Top image: Pakutaso

Insert image: Lawson
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ByLike Nagoya Admin Posted Jul 27, 2021

Nepartak approaching Japan, may make landfall

Weather officials in Japan forecast that tropical storm Nepartak will approach, or make landfall in northeastern Japan, or an area including Tokyo and several prefectures, on Tuesday. (NHK)
Source https://newsonjapan.com/

ByLike Nagoya Admin Posted Jul 26, 2021

From the Grand Sumo Tournament to Visiting a Sumo Stable: All Things Sumo in Nagoya Part 2

Sumo wrestling is an integral part of Japan’s culture and has been practiced in one form or another for around 2000 years.

In part 1 we shared everything you need to know if you are new to Sumo, and want to attend the Nagoya Grand Sumo Tournament. If you haven’t read it yet, follow this link.

But a Grand Sumo Tournament like the one held in Nagoya each summer isn’t the only way to experience Sumo. Nagoya also plays host to all 42 active Sumo Stables for around one month before and during the tournament. And many open their doors to visitors during the morning hours, to observe a stable’s morning practice.

The post From the Grand Sumo Tournament to Visiting a Sumo Stable: All Things Sumo in Nagoya Part 2 appeared first on Nagoya is not boring.

Source Nagoya is not boring

ByLike Nagoya Admin Posted Jul 24, 2021

16 Unforgettable Summer Festivals in Nagoya and Aichi in 2021

Summer is finally here! And with the arrival of the hot weather, we are ready to have some fun!
The Japanese summers are synonymous with incredible festivals. Summer inspires some of the most stunning Natsu Matsuri (summer festivals) with Obon dances and spectacular fireworks displays.

Everyone dresses up in their most beautiful Yukata and looks forward to the popular festival foods. Time to indulge in Yakisoba, Takoyaki, Kakigori, Castella, Taiyaki, Okonomiyaki, Ringo Ame, and many many more.

Another highlight, especially popular with young children, are the festival booths selling toys and offering games to catch real goldfish.

These summer festivals in Japan provide fantastic opportunities to experience local and traditional culture, music, art, drinks, and food.

In and around Nagoya, you will come across at least one summer festival almost every weekend between June and August. Here is a list of the top summer festivals in Nagoya and Aichi for you to enjoy.

… view more by clicking on source below.

The post 16 Unforgettable Summer Festivals in Nagoya and Aichi in 2021 appeared first on Nagoya is not boring.

Source Nagoya is not boring

ByLike Nagoya Admin Posted Jul 22, 2021

Drunk droning arrest first of its kind in Aichi Prefecture

Friends don’t let friends fly tiny helicopters drunk.

With the wide range of models and increasingly affordable pricing, drone flying has become an extremely fun hobby for many. However, as I always tell my kids, “with great fun comes great responsibility,” which is probably why they don’t like talking to me.

I’m not wrong though, and to prove it we have the arrest of a 56-year-old man who became the first in his prefecture to get busted for violating the newly enacted law against flying a drone while intoxicated.

The incident occurred on 12 June in Toyota City, Aichi Prefecture, when the suspect consumed eight cans of beer between the hours of 7 a.m. and noon. Interestingly enough, all that morning drinking motivated the suspect to start cleaning his room.

Our Japanese-side writer Seiji clearly needs to drink more.

While tidying, he happened upon a drone which he had bought a few years ago and took it out of the box to see if it still worked. Upon learning that it did, the drunken suspect abandoned his cleaning ambitions to take it for a spin.

However, while in flight, the drone weighing about 540 grams (1.2 pounds) collided with the window of a nearby residence. The neighbor called the police to report the crash and the ensuing investigation led them back to the suspect who admitted to the charges of drinking and droning.

He may have been surprised to learn that such a crime even existed, as a law regarding it had only been passed earlier this year when Japan revised its Civil Aeronautics Act to include various provision for drones. As a result, piloting a drone under the influence became officially prohibited and his was the first arrest of its kind in Aichi.

▼ News report on the arrest

It certainly surprised many readers of the news who had never heard of such a crime before, but could easily understand why it came to be.

“There’s also drunk driving for drones?”
“There’s no drunk flying for drones. I didn’t know that, but they can certainly do harm when they crash.”
“That’s silly. Drones can’t drink.”
“I’ve never piloted drunk before.”

“Just like with a car, nothing good can come of piloting a drone while drunk.”
“It certainly a law we need.”
“Drinking before noon, cleaning, playing with a drone, I can really sympathize with his situation though.”
“At least he just hit a window and not someone’s head.”
“I think you could get away with it in a place like America because it has more space, but it’s probably windier and harder to control too.”

It’s another example of how the law must adapt to keep up with changes in society and technology. However, we too as members of society have to adjust our behavior to adapt with these changes as well.

So the next time you get drunk for breakfast and get the urge to do some fancy flying, remember to do it in a safe and consequence-free environment. After all, that’s precisely the reason that Microsoft Flight Simulator was developed.

Source: NHK, Hachima Kiko
Top image: Pakutaso
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Source soranews24.com