Partying Nagoya Style: Meieki’s best Izakayas

When it comes to going out for drinks, in Japan, they do things a little differently than back home. Whereas we would most likely head to a bar, the Japanese go to an izakaya. Most translation tools will tell you that an izakaya is like a tavern or a pub, but that’s not quite right. While izakayas are very much drinking dens, particularly after work or at the start of a night out, unlike pubs there will be little or no interaction between separate parties. Also unlike pubs, all groups are seated and are served by waiters and waitresses at whom you must holler ‘sumimaseeeeen!’ to get their attention. That’s not to say things are any more sedate than bars back home. When the beer and highballs get flowing, things can get raucous, particularly as many izakaya offer ‘nomihoudai’ (all you can drink) courses. While drinking is generally very much on the agenda, izakayas are also places to eat, with patrons sharing dishes between them. While differing establishments may have their specialties, and some are more upmarket than others, the general description of the fare on offer could be “for the accompaniment of booze”. Think, karaage, edamame, sashimi, and yakitori. Fine dining this is not. As both a central business hub and home to one of the country’s largest train stations, the Meieki (literally translated as ‘Nagoya Station’) area has many izakayas to choose from, each servicing their niche. Below is a small selection that you might try. Kabuto All…
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Partying Nagoya Style: Meieki’s best Izakayas
Original Source: www.JapanInfoSwap.com
Partying Nagoya Style: Meieki’s best Izakayas

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